Gallery Shows

  • Holly Roberts, Adam and Eve
    From Uncharted Territory, March 2014

  • Orlando Leyba, Cuerda 
    from Overlap, January 2014

  • Rachel Zollinger, Seif, No. 2
    from Re(structure), January 2014

  • Dannee Ashton
    Recycled Heart: Artists of ArtStreet, Feburary 2014

  • Elaine Roy, xxoo Sending My Love
    from Contemporary Contrast, August 2014

  • Maude Adrade, Last Night's Blue Dress
    from Finding Reason, April 2014

  • Margi Weir, Fiscal Forecasting
    from Topical Tapestries, April 2014

  • Alan Paine Radebaugh
    October 2014

  • Ken Frink
    May 2014

  • Karl Hoffman
    May 2014

  • Evan Dent
    September 2014

  • Janet Shagam
    October 2014

SURFACE: Emerging Artists of New Mexico

Friday, June 02, 6:00pm

Opening Receptions & Community Celebration: Friday, June 2, 6 - 8pm
Exhibtions Run: June 2 – July 21, 2017

SURFACE: EMERGING ARTISTS OF NEW MEXICO
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Harwood Art Center's 4th annual SURFACE: Emerging Artists of New Mexico is a juried exhibition, endowed cash awards and professional development program. It is designed to cultivate the creative and professional growth of artistic talents and to expand their visibility and economic viability in our community. Learn more about past programs >

2017 Participating Artists are:

    Meghan Arcaro
    Jazmyn Crosby
    Margaret Farrell
    Michael Gomez
    Jessica Gross
    Kathryn Jaroneski
    Shaelin Jornigan
    Malcolm King
    Cecelia McKinnon
    Gwen Miller Wagner
    Gaspar Salazar-Mendez
    Jeremy Salazar

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP

The heart of SURFACE – and what sets the program apart both in Harwood’s annual calendar and from gallery exhibitions around the city – is the professional development component. The intensive full-day workshop focuses on, fundamentally, what it means to be and how to further oneself as a professional working artist. BFA / MFA programs do an excellent job of cultivating deep development in creative practice and theoretical - historical - contemporary frameworks. The SURFACE program looks at business practice and social - commercial - communication frameworks.

Christopher MacQueen, GhostPrism (detail), 2017

GHOSTPRISM: CHRISTOPHER MACQUEEN

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SURFACE 2016 Solo Exhibition Award Recipient Christopher MacQueen's exhibtion GhostPrism is a full-room installation that is populated by strings and painted lines that forge an environment with an ever-expanding depth of field. The artist invites viewers to participate in their own portrait while looking into reflective paintings; traversing a landscape where foreground, middle ground, and background are only complete when the spectator steps into the frame.

Christopher MacQueen was born in Taos, NM but now calls Albuquerque home. He studied Art Education and Art History at The University of New Mexico in Albuquerque where his studio concentration focused on printmaking and porcelain ceramics. His artwork has been included in a variety of exhibitions including the juried  ‘30 Under 30’ at the Santa Fe Convention Center, a solo show and permanent wall drawing at Eggman & Walrus Gallery in Santa Fe, as well as a selection of group exhibitions regionally. MacQueen’s paintings, sculptures and wall-drawings/installations are in numerous private collections in Albuquerque, Santa Fe and Taos. His interest in art began as a child producing epic wall drawings with his sister’s makeup and stolen highlighters. His favorite color is yellow.

PROGRAM PARTNERS

We are deeply grateful to The FUNd at Albuquerque Community Foundation, Bernalillo County, City of Albuquerque / Urban Enhancement Trust Fund, McCune Charitable Foundation, New Mexico Arts and National Endowment for the Arts for their support of SURFACE: Emerging Artists of New Mexico, as well as to Marion & Kathryn Crissey and Reggie Gammon for establishing our endowed awards for this program. SURFACE would not be possible without our extraordinary local business partners Albuquerque Art Business Association, A Good Sign, Tractor Brewing Company and Westbund West.

August Exhibitions

Friday, August 04, 6:00pm

Featuring Mary Sweet, and Bob & Gloria Mallory

Opening Reception: Friday, August 4, 6 - 8pm
Exhibitions Run: August 4 - August 24, 2017

Mary Sweet: Far Places

Far Places features paintings and woodblock prints of three far-flung and awe-inspiring places in the world: Cathedral Lake in the Maroon Wilderness of Colorado, Greenland, and the Shikoku Japan 88 Temple Trek. Mary believes the land provides us with everything from sustenance to solace, and yet we treat it as a disposable commodity. Mary’s paintings and prints are her way of spreading the importance and beauty of nature in the world.

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Bob & Gloria Mallory: We Paint What We See (In Space & Mind)

We Paint What We See is a reflection of Bob & Gloria’s individual personalities. Bob’s subdued and carefully rendered watercolor paintings depicting built and environmental structures convey his modest, intelligent, and inquisitive nature, while Gloria’s dynamic acrylics speak to the infinite ways we perceive reality and depict her intellectual inquiry into the mysteries of Spirit and Nature. Through their work, both artists illustrate their mutual passion for artistic exploration and learning, as well as a lifetime of shared adventures.

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About the artists

Mary Sweet

Mary Sweet has been a painter all her life, in watercolor and acrylics, and a woodblock printer since 1993. Landscape is her main interest. She received both Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees in Art from Stanford University. She has lived in Tijeras, NM since 1970. Mary has been in many one person and juried shows, including Introductions ‘76, Biennial, 2008 and Albuquerque Now, 2009 at the Albuquerque Museum; American Artist Magazine Golden Anniversary National Art Competition and Exhibition, 1987; Gilman, 2005 and 30 Views of Mt. Taylor, 2010 at Harwood Art Center. In 2006 she was included in Landscapes of New Mexico, Campbell & Deats, UNM Press and 100 Artists of the Southwest, Douglas Bullis, Schiffer Publishing Ltd. Mary’s work can be seen at Weyrich Gallery, Albuquerque. She has taught woodblock workshops for Harwood Art Center and the New Mexico Art League.

“The landscape has always been my primary inspiration. As a child I spent summers on my grandparents’ farm and treasured those days. I went hiking and camping as a Girl Scout. I always loved mountains, first Ohio’s gentle hills and then the grandeur of the Rockies and the West. When still a teenager I discovered the pull of the canyons and deserts and learned to love the wild places where there is time to see and hear and think.

“The land provides us with everything from sustenance to solace and yet we treat it as a disposable commodity and do not respect it or nature. My art work is my way of saying: This is what I saw and it is important and I want you to see it too.” – Mary Sweet

Mary’s reflections on the exhibition: 
“These are three places I have visited in the last several years, Cathedral Lake, Greenland, and Shikoku, Japan.

“Cathedral Lake is not so far away in distance, being in a Colorado Wilderness Area but you get there on foot up a pretty steep trail. It is one of my favorite places in the world and I have been there a number of times, including twice in 2015. It inspires reverence in me.

“I paint or print the places that inspire me, places of nature and spectacular scenery. I have been told often that serious artists can no longer paint landscapes, which are now only for Sunday Painters. Nonsense. Landscapes remind us of our heritage of Thoreau, Teddy Roosevelt, Tecumseh and John Muir. People are so indoors and so urban now that they forget. If there was ever a time to say landscapes are important, it is now, in an era of rampant environmental destruction.

“I wanted to go to Greenland to see Glaciers and Polar Bears before they were all gone. My husband and I went in 2016, on a small ship tour that was able to visit remote fjords. It was as spectacular a place as I believe exists on earth. Unfortunately, the future doesn’t look good. I’m grateful we got to go and for all we got to see.

“In 2015 we went to Shikoku, Japan to do part of the 88 Temple Trek with a hiking group out of Oregon. This is a Pilgrimage, founded by the Japanese Buddhist Saint, Kobo Daishi (774 - 835 A.D.). I first heard of him and the Pilgrimage in 2009 at his headquarters on Mt. Koya, Japan. He brought Shingon Buddhism over from China after a perilous trip, but was also a man of many talents: artist, sculptor, engineer, healer, believer that women too could become enlightened, and in education for all children. He revered nature, as befitted his Shinto heritage as well. The Pilgrimage is a slice of a very old piece of the world as it used to be and is respectful of the nature that it inhabits. The Japanese landscape seemed to call for woodblock prints, printed Japanese style with baren and watercolor inks.

“The landscape may lead me to the media I use, painting or print. I’m told my paintings look like prints and my prints like paintings. I like both media so that’s okay.” – Mary Sweet

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Bob Mallory

Bob Mallory is a practicing architect, and to-date continues a 65-year career. Bob was a partner at Stevens, Mallory, Pearl and Campbell for 45 years; after retiring he joined Rohde, May, Keller and McNamara as Senior Architect. Bob is currently a member of the American Institute of Architects and has served on the New Mexico Board of Examiners for Architects. Bob’s work as an architect reflects the careful attention to detail shown in his watercolors. For many years he has quietly created a treasure-trove of plein air studies of atmospheric landscapes, natural phenomena, and architectural structures.

Gloria Mallory

A 71-year resident of Albuquerque, Gloria Griffin Mallory’s schooling in Albuquerque began at the Harwood Girls’ School (now Harwood Art Center). Her pursuit of education gained a BFA in Theatre, an MA in English and a PhD in Linguistics and Statistics. During her extensive career, Gloria has worked as a teacher, as the Director of the Albuquerque Urban Observatory at UNM, as Headmistress of Manzano Day School, and as President and Head of School at Menaul School. After retiring, she began painting in 2007. Gloria’s paintings reflect her intellectual pursuit of “ways of knowing” in different realms and other orders of meaning.

Upcoming Exhibitions

Friday, September 08, 5:30pm

September

Artist Talk & Opening Reception: Friday, September 8, 5:30 - 8pm
Exhibitions Run: Septemeber 8 - 28, 2017

Main Gallery
DUALITY, a group exhibition produced by women artists through workshops with lead artist Jodie Herrera

Front Gallery
Invitation exhibition of women artists

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October

Opening Reception: Friday, October 6, 6 - 8pm
Exhibitions Run: October 6 - 26, 2017

Main Gallery
S(and) - Group Show, participating artists are, Lea Anderson, Shawn Turung, Stephanie Lerma, Rachel Popowcer, Jessamyn Lovell, Cedra Ardec, Valerie Roybal, Angela Berkson, Dana Kleinman, Kelly Eckel, Sally Condon, Jill Christian

Front Gallery
Helen Cozza

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December

Opening Reception: Saturday, December 2, 6 - 8pm
Exhibitions Run: December 2 - 8, 2017

Both Galleries: ((12x12))

HARWOOD STORIES

Kris Mills

Current Studio Artist


I was in Harwood’s very first show called Road To Chaos, organized by Jeff Kruger. My dog, Micro, was also in that show eating 30 hot dogs in a performance piece by Bryan Konefsky. I am back in a studio at Harwood for the second time after 4 years. This time I’m using the studio to do serigraphy with my collaborative friend Tom Loeb. Last time I used the studio to make sculpture. Harwood has given me many opportunities to show my own art and curate shows about the work my community, Albuquerque makes.  My dog Pablo and I are in and out of Harwood’s doors a lot because I now live in the neighborhood.

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