2015 Harvest CSA shares 
are on sale now! buy yours today >

Harvest CSA


What is Harvest?

Based on the model of community supported agriculture (CSA) programs, CSAs for art have sprung up all over the country in the last few years. Harwood Art Center is pleased to present New Mexico’s first art CSA, "Harvest," in partnership with community coordinators Jill Riester and Rachel Harris-Huffman.

Harvest CSA provides an opportunity for new collectors ("shareholders") to connect with local artists and for each participating artist to explore their practice in a new way, for an alternative purpose and with financial support. Each of our 40 Harvest CSA Shareholders will receive a box of thoughtfully curated, original pieces from 10 local artists at our first pick-up event in May 2015.

Buy your share now >

Who are the Participating Artists?

Our artists were selected from an incredibly competitive pool of submissions from around New Mexico. We are honored to include:

    Diane Alire - Photography
    Christopher Casey - Ceramics
    Jessica Kennedy - Painting
    Niya Lee - Ceramics
    Ray Maseman - Printmaking (etching & aquatint)
    Susie Protiva - Painting
    Luanne Redeye - Printmaking (screenprinting)
    Eileen Shaughnessy - Singer/Songwriter/Musician
    Thomas Tomlinson - Sculptural Relief Paintings
    Rachel Zollinger - Copper Relief

 

How do I become a Harvest CSA Shareholder?

The cost of each 2015 share is $425. There are only 40 shares available to the world, and we suspect they will sell out quickly. Shares are available for purchase now! Buy your share today >

We still have 2014 shares available for purchase for $350. Learn about our 2014 Harvest Artists and purchase your share now >

Questions?

Our Shareholder FAQs might address your questions. But if you have others, please email harvest(at)harwoodartcenter(dot)org


Samples of Work from our Inaugural Harvest CSA Artists

HARWOOD STORIES

Barbara Grothus

Former Harwood Artist


I remember when the Harwood was a big empty building and Friedje had recruited a few people from the community to brainstorm about what it might become. The art community was large; studio and gallery spaces were limited. A match was made, and as the space filled up, the vision evolved. Albuquerque United Artists had an office, and held exhibitions during the 1990s. In 2000, I collected burned relics from the Cerro Grande fire.The Harwood had a space available, and though I have always had my own studio (OK, those burned things were sooty), I rented a studio there while I worked on some ideas. Eventually, I had two shows about the fire The Harwood also awarded me an exhibition in 2005. That was a true honor. The place has been part of my life for the entire time it has existed as a “home for art and artists.

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