Artist Talk: Friday, May 3 at 5:30pm Opening Reception: Friday, May 3, 6 – 8pm Exhibitions Run: May 3 – 30, 2019

We are four printmakers living in New Mexico and our work is connected by our love of making hand-pulled prints. Each one of us utilizes a different approach to printmaking and a unique muse inspires each. Helen Cozza uses structured low relief collagraphs informed by the grid and nature represented within the confines of abstraction. Janet Shagam works from alternative print making modalities such as mokulito (lithography on wood) to explore local, national, and foreign environments. Aaron Bass creates intaglio prints that are based on an urban interpretation of animism, a universal human response.

About the Printmakers

We are four printmakers living in New Mexico and our work is connected by our love of making hand-pulled prints. Combined, each one of us has exhibited prints in galleries throughout the United States and in other countries including Germany, the United Kingdom, Korea, China and the Middle East. Helen Cozza was one of the national recipients of a 2011 Visual Artist’s Grant from the Astraea Foundation located in New York. Janet Shagam was included in a juried show at the Smithsonian Institute Ripley Gallery. Aaron Bass has taught printmaking at Southwest University of the Visual Arts and the University of New Mexico. Laurel Lampela taught Printmaking in the Art Education Program at the University of New Mexico. Helen Cozza considers her work to be a soft form of geometric abstraction. Two elements in her structured low relief collagraphs are the grid and nature represented within the confines of abstraction. The grid offers a method to contain and control the natural forms by enclosing them in predetermined borders. Janet Shagam works from alternative print making modalities such as mokulito (lithography on wood) cardboard etching, pigment transfer, and silk mezzotint to explore local, national, and foreign environments. In all cases, part or all of the process take place out-of-doors. Her goal is to condense her impressions into local color, shape, and rhythmic gestures. Aaron Bass creates intaglio prints that are based on an urban interpretation of animism, a universal human response to our surroundings. He uses subtle and less obvious archetypal imagery to transmit an idea or feeling. Bass developed his visual language by collecting objects that intuitively resonated with him and through his passion for reading folklore from a variety of cultures. Laurel Lampela’s polymer gravure prints from original photographs reflect her interest in responding to nature, to glimpses of life in the present moment. Each glimpse is a quiet presence of animals, people, and the space they occupy. This space provides the opportunity to linger in the process of being. Together, our work illustrates an appreciation of the multiple processes for making marks on paper to express our individual ways of communicating.